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BBE Central

Historical Female Figures in the Beauty Industry

March 25 /2020

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March is Women’s History Month, and as we enter a new decade led by some of the strongest female entrepreneurs and figures in skincare, makeup, and everything in between, we’re reminded of their predecessors. These women helped pave the way for beauty’s prosperity in the marketplace. Keep reading to learn more about just a few historical female figures in the beauty industry.

Elizabeth Arden

Elizabeth Arden

Elizabeth Arden is a true pioneer of the makeup industry. In 1910 she founded Red Door Salon in New York. Thereafter, she expanded with knowledge of beauty and skincare techniques learned both in the US and Paris. Through her work, she elevated the societal perception of makeup from its unsavory associations to an accepted part of any routine.

Every women has the right to be beautiful.

Elizabeth Arden

Simone Tata

Simone Tata

Simone Tata is credited with bringing the makeup industry to Indian markets. After being wed in India, she observed the state of beauty in the country—from mere creams or powders to extremes dawned by stereotypical “bad girls“. Tata was recruited to the board of Lakmé to help change this image and foster a beauty empire for India.

Helena Rubenstein

Helena Rubenstein

Helena Rubinstein created a brand that brought the skincare and makeup industry to new heights. After opening the Valaze House of Beauty salon in 1902, her skincare treatments began to gather attention. Through her factory in Saint Cloud, she helped formulate anti-aging products and makeup. She toyed with innovative methods like hormone creams or electro-stimulation. She was also the first person to open a beauty institute.

I never dreamed about success. I worked for it.

Estée Lauder

Estée Lauder

Estée Lauder

Entrepreneur Estée Lauder not only founded her own brand, but conducted business according to the wants of women. Her “High-Touch service” created a personable interaction with her customers, listening to their needs and showing product in action. She also traveled to every one of her stores openings to get a first-hand impression of reception.

Eunice W. Johnson

Eunice W. Johnson

Eunice W. Johnson helped start a line of cosmetics for women of color, where popular brands lacked the range to accommodate deeper skin tones. Inclusion and representation of women of color in the beauty/fashion industry was Johnson’s goal—especially in her creations such as the Ebony Fashion Fair. The touring fashion show featured African American models and designer’s work, highlighting their beauty and excellence amid mainstream under-representation.

Mary Kay

Mary Kay

Mary Kay is another reputable female figure in beauty. After experiencing workplace gender equality, Mary Kay Ash decided to champion her own company, by women, for women. She launched her company in 1963, creating a space for beauty that was female-driven.

While the beauty industry certainly has room to continue to grow, there’s no denying the impact women have had, and will continue to have. Especially with powerhouses such as our very own Beauty by Earth co-founder, Prudence Millsap!

Heres to a future of even more strong females—

Camille

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